August 20, 2019

Even if you only have a standard sewing machine, you can still achieve a lovely finish on your knits. Read on for my top twin-needle tips. Commercially-made knits are hemmed with a specialised machine called a coverstitcher. But if you don’t want to splash out on that just yet, all you need is a special needle called a twin needle. This creates two lines of stitching simultaneously, while the bobbin thread zig zags between the two on the underside. This stitch is naturally stretchy, making it perfect for knits.

Here are my tips for using a twin needle finish! 

-ALWAYS check to make sure your machine is set to a straight stitch, NOT a zig zag stitch before you start sewing with your twin needle. Because the twin needle is extra wide, zig zagging can cause the needle to hit the edge of your presser foot and break! 

-You have to work from the right side of your fabric! This means you will have to be careful not to wobble off the edge of your hem. I recommend that beginners press their hem first, and then use a spot on the machine’s throat plate as a guide to stay at the same distance from the edge.

-When threading your twin needles, both top threads go through the exact same guides, until the very last guide, where 1 thread is left out. This prevents tangling.

-If you are finishing a hem in the round, don’t backtack! Start stitching a little bit before the seam. Then simply overlap the stitches by about 1.5cm (⅝”) when you get back to where you started. This is both faster and tidier. 

-If you don’t want to have to buy a 2nd spool of thread for your 2nd needle, just wind some onto an extra bobbin and use that as one of your top threads, saving you from having loads of extra thread left at the end of your project.

-When you go over seams, make sure the garment moves through the machine evenly at this point so that you don’t get a lot of dense, tiny stitches. If needed, pause, sink the needles into the fabric, lift the presser foot, and release any bunching that has occurred before re-lowering the foot, and proceeding.

That's just a few tips for sewing with a twin needle. I hope you give it a try!





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